Walking the Talk: Three Keys to Ending Vaccine-Preventable Deaths

Walking the Talk: Three Keys to Ending Vaccine-Preventable Deaths

By Katrin DeCamp, Web, Manager & Senior Communications Specialist, USAID's Maternal and Child Survival Program and Robert Steinglass, Immunization Team Leader, Maternal and Child Survival Program

At month's end, African health and finance ministers will meet in Ethiopia for theMinisterial Conference on Immunization in Africa. Alongside technical experts and policymakers, their focus will be expanding access to vaccines, knowing 1 in 5 African children still don't receive all necessary immunizations.

Powering Programs With the Right Vaccines to the Right Place at the Right Time

Powering Programs With the Right Vaccines to the Right Place at the Right Time

By Joel Lamstein, President, John Snow, Inc. and World Education

Vaccines are among the most effective and inexpensive ways to fight infectious diseases and help people stay healthy. While there are a few people in affluent societies and troubled corners of the world who distrust vaccines, the history cannot be more clear: vaccines work. Unfortunately, not everyone has access to them.

 

Five Essential Readings Ahead of the Ministerial Conference on Immunization in Africa

Five Essential Readings Ahead of the Ministerial Conference on Immunization in Africa

By Robert SteinglassDirector of JSI’s Immunization Center

In preparation for the upcoming ministerial conference on immunization, read JSI's five recommended journal articles to review before the event.

Thumbnail photo courtesy of Translieu/David Mugithi

 

Saving lives through supply chain: solutions to support the next generation of vaccines

Saving lives through supply chain: solutions to support the next generation of vaccines

by Heidi Lasher, project coordinator for immunization supply chain advocacy at PATH.

Vaccines are sometimes called the backbone of the public health system. They are the first line of defense against infectious diseases, highly cost-effective, and meant to be available at every health facility, everywhere in the world, to protect health and save lives. But the power of vaccines is lost if we don’t have the ways and means to deliver them safely and efficiently to those who need them most.

10 Reasons Vaccines are the Best Protector of Human Life

10 Reasons Vaccines are the Best Protector of Human Life

by Dr. John Boslego, Former Director of PATH Vaccine Development Program

Immunization is one of the most powerful health interventions ever introduced. Every year, the World Health Organization estimates, vaccines save between 2 and 3 million children from killers such as polio, measles,pneumonia, and rotavirus diarrhea.
 

5 pneumonia solutions to get excited about

5 pneumonia solutions to get excited about

by Mark Alderson, Director of the pneumococcal vaccine and the polyvalent meningococcal vaccine projects in the Vaccine Development Program, PATH.

Fifteen years ago, roughly two million children under age five died from pneumonia annually. Today, that number is down by more than half, thanks to improved prevention and treatment interventions and their growing presence in traditionally underserved countries.
 

Isolated gains in immunization need to become the norm

Isolated gains in immunization need to become the norm

by Dr Jean-Marie Okwo-Bele,  Director of the Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals

Ten days and more than 11 million children vaccinated against measles and rubella – that’s 764 children reached every minute. These numbers continue to impress me when I think about last year’s game-changing immunization programmes that reached children often missed due to humanitarian emergencies.